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deep crankin.(percy)









CRANKING DEEP STRUCTURE

Sponsors make Bass Champs.com Possible, Please support them Exclusively.Date: Nov-03-2000Name: Paul Elias B.A.S.S. ProAbout: B.A.S.S. Professional

Since a memorable October week when I won the prestigious BASS Masters Classic using my ďkneeling and reelingĒ cranking technique, I have been labeled as a crankbait specialist. While I consider myself to be a versatile fisherman, Iíll gladly accept that label because cranking is my favorite way to catch bass. That is especially true of deep cranking. Cranking deep structure is not for everybody. Throwing those big-lipped crankbaits and powering them through the water is the most physically taxing technique in bass fishing. But if you want to discover some untapped schools of bass ó including some big bass ó it is worth the effort to learn the basics of deep cranking. It begins with using the proper equipment. Smooth-functioning, balanced tackle is the key to getting maximum depth out of these diving plugs, as well as conserving your strength. For casting and working medium-running crankbaits like the Mannís 10+, 15+ and Loudmouth, I use a 7-foot Quantum Tour Edition popping action rod. With deep-diving lures like Mannís 20+ and 30+, I switch to a 7 1/2-foot Tour Edition cranking action rod. The long rods allow me to better handle the bait and cast it farther, which converts into depth once I get the lure coming back to the boat.In all of my deep-cranking situations, I use a Quantum Pro1C baitcasting reel, which features a 5-to-1 gear ratio retrieve for the power you need to bring these big crankbaits through the water.When it comes to selecting a lure for deep cranking, the 30+ is absolutely the deepest-running plug of all. But after throwing it all day, it will take its toll physically.The best all-around crankbait Iíve ever found is the Mannís 20+. Although it will reach the 20-foot mark, this bait dives so quickly that it is extremely effective in the 8- to 12-foot range. It casts surprisingly well, gets to the bottom quickly and stays in productive water longer than other crankbaits.One of my newest favorites is the Loudmouth by Mannís, a fat-bodied lure that contains rattles and makes more noise than any crankbait on the market. Capable of reaching 15 feet, the Loudmouth duplicates the kind of rattling noise that had been limited to shallow-running shad-type crankbaits like the Rat-L-Trap. It is a proven fact that noise produces strikes ó thatís why anglers load their plastic worms and jigs with rattles. And that is why the Loudmouth is so productive.When it comes to color, I really believe that the most productive color on a crankbait is chartreuse. It has to have chartreuse on it (my favorite is chartreuse with a brown back). I think chartreuse imitates one of the prevalent colors of a bluegill, which is a year-round forage for bass. So that color is always present in the bassí environment.Learning where to spend your time deep cranking is a matter of on-the-water experience, but one of the easiest ways to find good cranking structure is to fish the river channel itself. The river channel is marked in most areas, particularly in the southern reservoirs. You can just run the channel markers and fish the channel. Youíll be surprised how successful youíll be just concentrating on the river channel. My favorite deep-cranking structure is a well-defined reservoir ledge, either along a creek channel or on the main river. These are areas that traditionally hold good concentrations of bass, yet go unmolested by fishermen unskilled at using electronics and fishing deep structure. The most important aspect of fishing a ledge or other invisible structure is boat positioning. It is an often overlooked part of fishing, but with this type of fishing it is absolutely crucial.Although the elements often dictate otherwise, I take the same basic two-pronged approach to boat positioning for properly fishing ledges. Generally, I mark the perimeter of the breakline with buoys and then position my Procraft boat on the deeper side and cast my lure to the shallower side of the drop.If that doesnít produce, I move my boat tighter to the ledge and parallel it as closely as possible. This is a particularly productive way to fish a deep-diving crankbait.In nine situations out of 10, I will position my boat in the deep water and cast to the shallow side. The main reason for that is that on our reservoirs, Iím usually fishing around some type of cover on a ledge, like stumps or brush. When you try to pull a bait from deep water into shallow water, you will constantly stay hung up in the cover. By Paul Elias















CRANKING DEEP STRUCTURE

Sponsors make Bass Champs.com Possible, Please support them Exclusively.Date: Nov-03-2000Name: Paul Elias B.A.S.S. ProAbout: B.A.S.S. Professional

Since a memorable October week when I won the prestigious BASS Masters Classic using my ďkneeling and reelingĒ cranking technique, I have been labeled as a crankbait specialist. While I consider myself to be a versatile fisherman, Iíll gladly accept that label because cranking is my favorite way to catch bass. That is especially true of deep cranking. Cranking deep structure is not for everybody. Throwing those big-lipped crankbaits and powering them through the water is the most physically taxing technique in bass fishing. But if you want to discover some untapped schools of bass ó including some big bass ó it is worth the effort to learn the basics of deep cranking. It begins with using the proper equipment. Smooth-functioning, balanced tackle is the key to getting maximum depth out of these diving plugs, as well as conserving your strength. For casting and working medium-running crankbaits like the Mannís 10+, 15+ and Loudmouth, I use a 7-foot Quantum Tour Edition popping action rod. With deep-diving lures like Mannís 20+ and 30+, I switch to a 7 1/2-foot Tour Edition cranking action rod. The long rods allow me to better handle the bait and cast it farther, which converts into depth once I get the lure coming back to the boat.In all of my deep-cranking situations, I use a Quantum Pro1C baitcasting reel, which features a 5-to-1 gear ratio retrieve for the power you need to bring these big crankbaits through the water.When it comes to selecting a lure for deep cranking, the 30+ is absolutely the deepest-running plug of all. But after throwing it all day, it will take its toll physically.The best all-around crankbait Iíve ever found is the Mannís 20+. Although it will reach the 20-foot mark, this bait dives so quickly that it is extremely effective in the 8- to 12-foot range. It casts surprisingly well, gets to the bottom quickly and stays in productive water longer than other crankbaits.One of my newest favorites is the Loudmouth by Mannís, a fat-bodied lure that contains rattles and makes more noise than any crankbait on the market. Capable of reaching 15 feet, the Loudmouth duplicates the kind of rattling noise that had been limited to shallow-running shad-type crankbaits like the Rat-L-Trap. It is a proven fact that noise produces strikes ó thatís why anglers load their plastic worms and jigs with rattles. And that is why the Loudmouth is so productive.When it comes to color, I really believe that the most productive color on a crankbait is chartreuse. It has to have chartreuse on it (my favorite is chartreuse with a brown back). I think chartreuse imitates one of the prevalent colors of a bluegill, which is a year-round forage for bass. So that color is always present in the bassí environment.Learning where to spend your time deep cranking is a matter of on-the-water experience, but one of the easiest ways to find good cranking structure is to fish the river channel itself. The river channel is marked in most areas, particularly in the southern reservoirs. You can just run the channel markers and fish the channel. Youíll be surprised how successful youíll be just concentrating on the river channel. My favorite deep-cranking structure is a well-defined reservoir ledge, either along a creek channel or on the main river. These are areas that traditionally hold good concentrations of bass, yet go unmolested by fishermen unskilled at using electronics and fishing deep structure. The most important aspect of fishing a ledge or other invisible structure is boat positioning. It is an often overlooked part of fishing, but with this type of fishing it is absolutely crucial.Although the elements often dictate otherwise, I take the same basic two-pronged approach to boat positioning for properly fishing ledges. Generally, I mark the perimeter of the breakline with buoys and then position my Procraft boat on the deeper side and cast my lure to the shallower side of the drop.If that doesnít produce, I move my boat tighter to the ledge and parallel it as closely as possible. This is a particularly productive way to fish a deep-diving crankbait.In nine situations out of 10, I will position my boat in the deep water and cast to the shallow side. The main reason for that is that on our reservoirs, Iím usually fishing around some type of cover on a ledge, like stumps or brush. When you try to pull a bait from deep water into shallow water, you will constantly stay hung up in the cover. By Paul Elias













CRANKING DEEP STRUCTURE

Sponsors make Bass Champs.com Possible, Please support them Exclusively.Date: Nov-03-2000Name: Paul Elias B.A.S.S. ProAbout: B.A.S.S. Professional

Since a memorable October week when I won the prestigious BASS Masters Classic using my ďkneeling and reelingĒ cranking technique, I have been labeled as a crankbait specialist. While I consider myself to be a versatile fisherman, Iíll gladly accept that label because cranking is my favorite way to catch bass. That is especially true of deep cranking. Cranking deep structure is not for everybody. Throwing those big-lipped crankbaits and powering them through the water is the most physically taxing technique in bass fishing. But if you want to discover some untapped schools of bass ó including some big bass ó it is worth the effort to learn the basics of deep cranking. It begins with using the proper equipment. Smooth-functioning, balanced tackle is the key to getting maximum depth out of these diving plugs, as well as conserving your strength. For casting and working medium-running crankbaits like the Mannís 10+, 15+ and Loudmouth, I use a 7-foot Quantum Tour Edition popping action rod. With deep-diving lures like Mannís 20+ and 30+, I switch to a 7 1/2-foot Tour Edition cranking action rod. The long rods allow me to better handle the bait and cast it farther, which converts into depth once I get the lure coming back to the boat.In all of my deep-cranking situations, I use a Quantum Pro1C baitcasting reel, which features a 5-to-1 gear ratio retrieve for the power you need to bring these big crankbaits through the water.When it comes to selecting a lure for deep cranking, the 30+ is absolutely the deepest-running plug of all. But after throwing it all day, it will take its toll physically.The best all-around crankbait Iíve ever found is the Mannís 20+. Although it will reach the 20-foot mark, this bait dives so quickly that it is extremely effective in the 8- to 12-foot range. It casts surprisingly well, gets to the bottom quickly and stays in productive water longer than other crankbaits.One of my newest favorites is the Loudmouth by Mannís, a fat-bodied lure that contains rattles and makes more noise than any crankbait on the market. Capable of reaching 15 feet, the Loudmouth duplicates the kind of rattling noise that had been limited to shallow-running shad-type crankbaits like the Rat-L-Trap. It is a proven fact that noise produces strikes ó thatís why anglers load their plastic worms and jigs with rattles. And that is why the Loudmouth is so productive.When it comes to color, I really believe that the most productive color on a crankbait is chartreuse. It has to have chartreuse on it (my favorite is chartreuse with a brown back). I think chartreuse imitates one of the prevalent colors of a bluegill, which is a year-round forage for bass. So that color is always present in the bassí environment.Learning where to spend your time deep cranking is a matter of on-the-water experience, but one of the easiest ways to find good cranking structure is to fish the river channel itself. The river channel is marked in most areas, particularly in the southern reservoirs. You can just run the channel markers and fish the channel. Youíll be surprised how successful youíll be just concentrating on the river channel. My favorite deep-cranking structure is a well-defined reservoir ledge, either along a creek channel or on the main river. These are areas that traditionally hold good concentrations of bass, yet go unmolested by fishermen unskilled at using electronics and fishing deep structure. The most important aspect of fishing a ledge or other invisible structure is boat positioning. It is an often overlooked part of fishing, but with this type of fishing it is absolutely crucial.Although the elements often dictate otherwise, I take the same basic two-pronged approach to boat positioning for properly fishing ledges. Generally, I mark the perimeter of the breakline with buoys and then position my Procraft boat on the deeper side and cast my lure to the shallower side of the drop.If that doesnít produce, I move my boat tighter to the ledge and parallel it as closely as possible. This is a particularly productive way to fish a deep-diving crankbait.In nine situations out of 10, I will position my boat in the deep water and cast to the shallow side. The main reason for that is that on our reservoirs, Iím usually fishing around some type of cover on a ledge, like stumps or brush. When you try to pull a bait from deep water into shallow water, you will constantly stay hung up in the cover. By Paul Elias

hi jacques,hope you get that boat soon,just saying hi to all out there.i'm fishinh roodekopjes on friday,so i'll send you a report of that over the weekend.this is an interesting article on cranks.read it as i found it good info.

greetings

Brush Hog.(du preez)